José M. Costa-García gives a lecture on Roman Military Archaeology at Newcastle University


[ ENG ]

The School of History, Classics and Archaeology (University of Newcastle, UK) has invited our colleague José M. Costa to give a lecture about Roman Military Archaeology in NW Iberia as part of its Archaeology Seminars programme.The seminar, named “From Classical Archaeology to Digital Archaeology: a review on the conquest and military occupation of NW Iberia by the Romans”, will take place at 18:00 on the 7th of November in the Armstrong Building, room 1.06.

You can check the abstract here:

Until not so many years ago, the majority of the studies on the Roman conquest and military occupation of NW Iberia were very dependent on the analysis of the scarce literary and epigraphical sources. During the decades of 1990-2000, the development of urban archaeology and the use of new field survey methods led to the awakening of Roman Military Archaeology as a discipline in Spain. Several sites were discovered then in the northernmost territories of the Iberian Peninsula. Some of them were linked with the campaigns of Augustus against the Cantabri and Astures, or the immediate post-war period. The new data contributed to change the previous, static visions on the Roman military presence, but also laid the foundations for a revolution to come. The increasing availability of new geographical data and the general process of digitalisation in Archaeology allowed the development of cost-effective, specific methodologies based on the combination of remote sensing techniques (aerial photography, satellite imagery, aerial photogrammetry, airborne LiDAR), GIS software and archaeological field survey. The archaeological evidence related to the Roman military has grown exponentially, it is more diversified now, and it also covers the territory to a greater extent. In addition, this phenomenon led to the democratisation of the archaeological research process in the last decades. However, the Roman Military Archaeology in Hispania still lacks studies characterised by a holistic perspective. To what extent can these data, resources, techniques and methodologies help us to build up new narratives on the conquest and occupation of NW Iberia? More information on the website of the School.

[ GAL ]

A Escola de Historia, Estudos Clásicos e Arqueoloxía (Universidade de Newcastle, Reino Unido) invitou ao noso colega José M. Costa para dar unha charla sobre arqueoloxía militar romana no noroeste peninsular como parte do seu programa de Seminarios de Arqueoloxía.

A charla, titulada “From Classical Archaeology to Digital Archaeology: a review on the conquest and military occupation of NW Iberia by the Romans”, terá lugar ás 18:00 o día 7 de novembro no Armstrong Building, aula 1.06.

Podes consultar aquí o resumo (en inglés):

Until not so many years ago, the majority of the studies on the Roman conquest and military occupation of NW Iberia were very dependent on the analysis of the scarce literary and epigraphical sources. During the decades of 1990-2000, the development of urban archaeology and the use of new field survey methods led to the awakening of Roman Military Archaeology as a discipline in Spain. Several sites were discovered then in the northernmost territories of the Iberian Peninsula. Some of them were linked with the campaigns of Augustus against the Cantabri and Astures, or the immediate post-war period. The new data contributed to change the previous, static visions on the Roman military presence, but also laid the foundations for a revolution to come.

The increasing availability of new geographical data and the general process of digitalisation in Archaeology allowed the development of cost-effective, specific methodologies based on the combination of remote sensing techniques (aerial photography, satellite imagery, aerial photogrammetry, airborne LiDAR), GIS software and archaeological field survey. The archaeological evidence related to the Roman military has grown exponentially, it is more diversified now, and it also covers the territory to a greater extent. In addition, this phenomenon led to the democratisation of the archaeological research process in the last decades.

However, the Roman Military Archaeology in Hispania still lacks studies characterised by a holistic perspective. To what extent can these data, resources, techniques and methodologies help us to build up new narratives on the conquest and occupation of NW Iberia?

Máis información na páxina da Escola.

[ CAS ]

La Escuela de Historia, Estudios Clásicos y Arqueología (Universidad de Newcastle, Reino Unido) ha invitado a nuestro colega Jose M. Costa a dar una charla sobre arqueología militar romana en el noroeste peninsular como parte de su programa de Seminarios de Arqueología.La charla, titulada “From Classical Archaeology to Digital Archaeology: a review on the conquest and military occupation of NW Iberia by the Romans”, tendrá lugar a las 18:00 el día 7 de novembro en el Armstrong Building, aula 1.06.

Puedes leer aquí el resumen de la charla (en inglés):

Until not so many years ago, the majority of the studies on the Roman conquest and military occupation of NW Iberia were very dependent on the analysis of the scarce literary and epigraphical sources. During the decades of 1990-2000, the development of urban archaeology and the use of new field survey methods led to the awakening of Roman Military Archaeology as a discipline in Spain. Several sites were discovered then in the northernmost territories of the Iberian Peninsula. Some of them were linked with the campaigns of Augustus against the Cantabri and Astures, or the immediate post-war period. The new data contributed to change the previous, static visions on the Roman military presence, but also laid the foundations for a revolution to come. The increasing availability of new geographical data and the general process of digitalisation in Archaeology allowed the development of cost-effective, specific methodologies based on the combination of remote sensing techniques (aerial photography, satellite imagery, aerial photogrammetry, airborne LiDAR), GIS software and archaeological field survey. The archaeological evidence related to the Roman military has grown exponentially, it is more diversified now, and it also covers the territory to a greater extent. In addition, this phenomenon led to the democratisation of the archaeological research process in the last decades. However, the Roman Military Archaeology in Hispania still lacks studies characterised by a holistic perspective. To what extent can these data, resources, techniques and methodologies help us to build up new narratives on the conquest and occupation of NW Iberia? Más información en la página de la Escuela.

#conferencia #NWIberia #arqueologíamilitar